The best Nintendo DS emulators for Android


The Nintendo DS is without doubt one of the hottest handheld consoles of all time. Its iconic value is good up there with that of the sport Boy and the PSP. There have been some amazing games for the system and infrequently it’s easier to maintain those games in your phone than to hold around a second device to play them. Sadly, development of the Nintendo DS emulator platform remains to be quite new so the decisions for emulators are scarce. However, there are some decent ones and we’ll check out them!

[Price: Free / $5.99]
First up is DraStic DS Emulator and, simply put, it’s the best Nintendo DS emulator available. It contains a high game compatibility, good speed, and contours which include fast forward mode, various display options, and support for Google Drive. It’s rated a 4.6 within the Play Store and it is the only DS emulator rated over 4.0. It’s $5.99 that could sound expensive but on this instance, you get what you pay for. In case you are in search of a DS emulator, that is pretty much as good because it gets for at this time.

[Price: Free]
nds4droid is the most well liked Nintendo DS emulator option. It is not all that good but it surely was steadily improving. The developer is comparatively active however the improvements has been slow coming. It is a 3.6 rating and there are some games that work well, but there are still many who don’t. It’s an open source project so other developers can contribute so there’s hope that this app will continue to enhance. On the subject of quality, it is a distant second from DraStic.

[Price: Free]
Open NDS Emulator is another open source effort it truly is somewhat current. Like nds4droid, it isn’t remarkable but there’s hope that the app will improve as updates have occurred recently. a number of people have had success with it but generally it is not ok for normal use. The hope is that the character of open source takes its course with this app and the improvements come eventually.

[Price: Free]
Pretendo NDS Emulator is last at the list but no less than it is not the worst. Additionally it is open source and according to the ds4droid source code. It fairs better than Open DS Emulator in relation to rating and functionality but sadly not by much. Just like the others, that’s free and you’ll try your luck to determine if it really works for you but just like the others it is a work in progress.

Wrap up

For the time being the Nintendo DS emulator app selection is disappointing. DraStic seems to have it right however the competition remains pretty stuck. In case you are here in search of an emulator, our recommendation is to throw down the $5.99 and purchase DraStic since it should be would becould very well be it slow before these other ones are pretty much as good. The explanation we included them is since the developers look like active (no less than this calendar year) and their projects are open source in order that they represent the precise hope we now have that the emulator platform gets more diverse. Until they improve, just buy DraStic. If we missed a very good DS emulator, please tell us within the comments!

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5 changes PS Vita needs to threaten Nintendo 3DS

  • Posted April 23rd, 2014 at 05:19 EDT by Shawnee Lee

PlayStation Vita launched back in 2012 and worldwide sales had been lackluster over its two year lifespan. The contest, the 3DS, faced the identical problem when the system debuted back in 2011. However, shortly after Vita’s premiere, the 3DS blasted off and sold well in both Japan and North America.

April 2014 sees Sony’s second handheld balling in Japan at present, though the 3DS has two units, 3DS XL and 3DS, within the top 10 chart. Add the Nintendo original and revision together and the Nintendo 3DS remains to be opening up a can of whoop ass on Vita.

Nintendo is easily established during this handheld war, as a result of its hardware being the cheaper option, in addition to hosting more blockbuster titles equivalent to Resident Evil Revelations and Mario Kart 8. However, the one dedicated HD gaming device in the marketplace will not be far-off from catching it up and potentially passing its rival. Sony’s Vita simply needs five adjustments to compete with Nintendo’s juggernaut.

The very first thing that should change is support from Sony outside of Japan. Currently, Japanese gamers give you the option of purchasing Vita in many different colors, from brown to lime green. People from the Island Of The Sun even have access to niche games that don’t always make their thanks to Europe or North America (NA). Sony should also blow up gaming events like E3 and the Tokyo Game Show showcasing their handheld: present loads of new IPs and innovative titles and announce creative game/memory card/accessory bundles; and absolutely give NA and Europe more color options – black only is growing old.

In order to fight fire you want fire; Vita needs a ton of games like the PS3 has and the PS4 could have. Regardless that less powerful and advanced, its 3D enemy has more system seller exclusives than digits on our hands. The irony is that these AAA titles aren’t necessarily innovative or new IPs, they’re just excellent products. This proves that Sony’s newest handheld doesn’t always need new concepts, but just quality results.

The third item that should be addressed is memory. Rather than giving PlayStation “Life” internal memory for storage, Sony created memory cards in sizes comparable to 4 GB, 8 GB, 16GB, etc. There are three major issues of this: inconvenience, price, sizes. The PS4, Xbox One, or even its opponent the 3DS have internal memory by which which you can download and install to one’s hearts content. That will save progress and files at the handheld, you must purchase a memory card, that’s expensive with the 32 GB memory card costing around $100 each. 32 GB could seem like quite a few room, but PlayStation Plus members would beg to vary. In an effort to solve this problem, the straightforward solution is to feature more internal memory, greater than the 1GB in Vita slim. Sony should do that greater than kittens want a bath, although it causes the cost to head up.

One noticeable problem is advertising and promotion. Gamers watch T.V. channels which includes ESPN, HBO, and MTV and it’s surprising there aren’t any Vita commercials or only a few are shown while Xbox One and PS4 ads are so common. In addition they view videos on youtube but no sign of the gaming system there either. At E3, Sony makes announcements including a Vita Slim and that there’ll be more games for it, but where are they? Aside from the indie titles, where are the system sellers? Sony should preview the larger projects, not only indie work. If Sony would take some time and correctly display the machine’s assets it is going to sell better.

Finally, something controversial but beneficial must happen: Vita exclusives have to STAY only on Vita. It was common for PSP games to be ported to the PS3 like God of War: Ghost of Sparta and an analogous scenario has happened to Sony’s Vita: Assassin’s Creed III Liberation. The issue with that is it defeats the point of purchasing a PlayStation Vita and lessens the variety of Vita-only games in comparison to 3DS-only games. Also, Sony needs more first party developers to work on Vita, equivalent to Santa Monica, Naughty Dog, and Sucker Punch.

Some of the things listed would possibly not happen and a few of them can be an unrealistic fantasy . . . or even not. Something is definite, if Sony keeps bringing interesting games to Vita, the space between the 2 handhelds will shrink. Will it ever disappear? For that to happen, Vita would need to dominate in countries outside of Japan. What happens if the Vita ever catches and surpasses the 3DS? It’d be a UConn-over-Florida style of upset, a leading seed being beat by a eighth ranked seed, because Nintendo has ruled handheld gaming for thus long and with an iron fist. However, eventually, the Vita STILL has the prospective to be one of the crucial greatest gaming devices of all time. It’s as much as Sony to capitalize on that potential.

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Wii TV: Nintendo’s ‘TVii’ Combines Television, Netflix, Twitter And A Super-Remote Control

There’s a brand new Wii U feature available that has Nintendo execs more excited than Mario after rescuing the princess from the ultimate castle.

On Thursday, a television-centric feature called the TVii could be coming to Nintendo Wii U devices via a free download.

“The corporate that modified how we play is ready to switch how we watch,” trumpets the official Nintendo press release.

“[Y]ou’ll never take a look at your TV a similar way again,” Nintendo of America President and COO Reggie Fils-Aime added in an announcement. In a separate interview with The Huffington Post, Fils-Aime continued to hype the TVii (pronounced tee-vee, naturally), saying that just because the original Wii and its motion control revolutionized gaming, so too would the TVii feature revolutionize the way in which we watch television.

So what’s this TVii, this odd four-letter word that has the people at Nintendo so jazzed?

Essentially, TVii is the non-gaming aspect of the Nintendo Wii U, the brand new Nintendo console that was released in October. It is the pitch to holiday buyers who want not only a video-gaming system, but in addition a replacement for his or her set-top box and a brand new thanks to watch movies on their plasma screens.

On the foremost elemental level, TVii connects three customarily separate aspects of the fashionable television watching experience: cable television, video-on-demand services like Netflix or Hulu Plus, and the second one-screen experience (surfing the net once you watch). It allows users to access all of this content throughout the system, without changing inputs or finding their television remotes, and it also lets users search simultaneously across live television, on-demand content and their all-you-can-eat streaming services.

Other consoles, like the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, enable gamers to take a break from “Call of Duty” to watch some Netflix, but only the Wii U will also make it possible to watch live TV through Comcast or Dish Network.

Nintendo obviously hopes this added functionality will be an important differentiator for shoppers, as the Wii U is off to a lukewarm start. Thus far, initial Wii U sales have been solid, if unspectacular. By some measures, Microsoft’s 3-year-old Xbox 360 is still outselling it , and Nintendo president Satoru Iwata was forced to apologize to early buyers for the raft of system updates that greeted gamers upon first plugging in. This will be another update, and one that is coming months later than promised , without support for Netflix and TiVo , which will follow in early 2013, Nintendo promises.

In other words: Nintendo could use a hit with TVii. Does it have enough firepower, or is it doomed to fall into the ignominy of Bowser’s lava?

TO GAME OR TO WATCH?

Whether or not an integrated television software suite can actually boost sales isn’t quite clear, though recent trends suggest that, more and more, consoles are being used not just as conduits to video games, but as home entertainment centers. In March, Microsoft announced that entertainment app usage had surpassed multiplayer gaming on the Xbox . Nintendo is hoping to capitalize on that momentum with the TVii, a system that is nothing if not innovative and completely distinct from what the competition offers.

Here’s how it works.

Everything starts with the GamePad, the combination tablet/game controller that is central to the Wii U (and probably its most divisive feature). The GamePad interacts with your television in two ways. First, owners can connect the GamePad to their televisions in order to control the basic functions of the television. The GamePad can be used to change the channel, volume, or input; power the TV set on or off; and access the channel guide.

Second, the TVii software enables you to watch movies or television shows from several different sources, in what Nintendo execs say is a more connected and coherent interface than their competitors offer. It pulls your cable listings, based on your provider, into the console, so that you scan and tune to the show of your choice from within your Nintendo. As on other consoles, you’re able to sign into online video services like Netflix, Hulu Plus or Amazon Instant Video, so that you can watch any of those services on your screen. It can also reach your DVR, though for now, Nintendo has only signed on TiVo as a participant. Nintendo of America director Zach Fountain says that other DVRs may be added in the future.

Nintendo has put together a search function that integrates those two disparate modes of cable listings and online media services, so that when you search for a show or movie, the system scans through both. You can choose how you want to monitor the given show, and the Wii U will automatically tune to the program through the service of your choice.

Nintendo has also weaved social media into the service, giving users the option to tweet, post to Facebook or share in the MiiVerse (a new social network for Nintendo users) about any live TV or movie moment from within the GamePad software, without interrupting the content. A team of curators may even push relevant information to the GamePad, including scores from around the league and shot charts for the NBA, as well as screenshots of key moments and filmographic information for major sitcoms and reality TV shows.

TVii also ships with parental controls, as well as a “personalized guide” for each member of the household, which enables family members to choose their favorite channels and place them in a customized grid accessible on their own Wii profiles.

Here’s the video that Nintendo first used to pitch TVii, which will also provide a little more color on some of the features:

[embedded content]

DOES TVii GIVE YOU GLEE?

Whether Nintendo’s execution meets its ambition would be determined Thursday afternoon, because the TVii update hits Wii U’s around the United States and Canada. The Wii U’s $299 starting price tag will likely keep non-gamers from buying it as an alternative to the cheaper Boxee TV, which also integrates live television with video-on-demand and streaming services. But it could help sway casual gamers who are at the fence about which system to buy with their Christmas bonuses.

At least one thing’s for sure: If you have the televisionii and the Wii U GamePad controls your television, it’ll be pretty dang hard to lose your remote ever again.

You’ll be able to learn more about Nintendo TVii by visiting the official TVii website here .

Nintendo developer says the 3DS couldn’t handle NES games

It’s no secret that the Nintendo 3DS is not the strongest handheld gaming device that you can purchase. Sony’s PS Vita looks amazing for a handheld, and smartphones and tablets can pump out some impressive visuals. The 3DS isn’t a slouch, but its capabilities definitely fall in step with Nintendo’s history of low power hardware. Now, certainly one of Nintendo’s own developers has implied that the Nintendo 3DS isn’t strong enough to handle NES Remix, a (what else?) mini-game collection composed of brief bits of old NES games, but altered somehow.

In a quote he should have quickly regretted. Series director Koichi Hayashida stated that NES Remix was delivered to the Wii U as opposed to the Nintendo 3DS since the team needed more power than the Nintendo 3DS provided: ”In order to perform what we would have liked with NES Remix, and get the effect we needed out of it and the worth that we needed it to have, we would have liked some more machine power.”

If that seems a touch vague, Hayashida then went directly to cement the 3DS as not powerful enough to deal with a game composed of NES mini-games: “I think the Wii U offered that up for us pretty easily, and it just would were harder to do it for the 3DS.”

[embedded content]

Even though a number of us haven’t been thrilled with Nintendo for quite a while and are not surprised by its missteps anymore, this tidbit is senseless even for Nintendo. If NES games could run at the NES, they might certainly run at the 3DS, a machine built 30 or so years after the NES. These aren’t even full NES games, but little WarioWare-style challenges. So, what gives?

Perhaps angering the Nintendo gods even further, Hayashida also noted that the team was more familiar making games for the Wii U , in order that played an element in skipping the 3DS. Yes, if the $64000 reason was simply that the team wasn’t wonderful at coding for the 3DS, Hayashida probably should’ve just said as much without decrying the 3DS as not powerful enough to address little slices of 30-year-old games.

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Can Nintendo Recover From Its Wii U Disaster?

Source: Nintendo.com.

Approximately a year and a half after the discharge of the Nintendo Wii U, it’s safe to categorize the system as a disaster. The console is hampered by an opulent controller that didn’t spur consumer interest and a scarcity of meaningful software support from third-party publishers. Even worse, the Wii U remains selling at a loss for Nintendo (NASDAQOTH: NTDOY     ) and its slow sales make reducing its build cost difficult.

As the system continues on its abysmal trajectory, the worth of Nintendo’s tried-and-true IPs are in peril. The company’s next moves are crucial. The Wii U is destined to head down as essentially the mostsome of the most ill-conceived pieces of gaming hardware in history, and Nintendo’s place as a hardware manufacturer is in jeopardy. The level of the console’s failure necessitates that the corporate face reality and make substantive changes to its business model. How can Nintendo get back from the Wii U?

Wii U has forced Nintendo to change
Now that Nintendo has admitted that the Wii U isn’t more healthy, attention turns to how the corporate can restore its fortunes. Its biggest successes over the past decade came from products that sought to switch the style games were experienced. Alternatively, the failure of the Wii U may be traced to a misguided application of that very same strategy.

Nintendo must decide whether it is going to another time pitch its next console at the promise of an unproven gimmick consumers or offer a more conventional console that is dependent upon the strength of Nintendo software. The corporate may also look to diversify its business with a still-mysterious move into “quality of life” offerings.

Nintendo faces very similar challenges to those that dogged its outlook within the days of the GameCube. Sony and Microsoft are essentially the most relevant players in the house console space and the portable market is asking increasingly crowded, this time as a result of mass adoption of smartphones rather then a dedicated competitor like Sony’s PSP. With that during mind, it is not surprising that Nintendo is returning to a variation of the “third pillar” strategy that produced the incredibly successful DS handheld.

What is “quality of life”?
The specifics of Nintendo’s quality-of-life business are set to be detailed in June on the E3 gaming expo, but some basic facts are known. The QOL ventures can be break away the company’s console endeavors and could be headed up by a separate team. President and CEO Satoru Iwata has also stated that the company’s plans don’t have anything to do with the wearable computing push which is currently under way.

Source: Nintendo.com.

Nintendo previously found tremendous success with its health-promoting Wii Fit software, but whether the corporate can build a stand-alone business around similar principles inside the age of abundant dieting and exercise apps remains questionable. That said, the company’s short-term outlook is extremely depending on its ability to debut a viable QOL marketing strategy inside the coming months.

Nintendo must win back publishers
The biggest problem facing Nintendo at the console front is an absence of support from third-party publishers. When the Wii U was first announced, Nintendo boasted of an “unprecedented partnership” with Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: EA     ) that would ultimately disintegrate and cause the yankee publisher to desert the console altogether. Instead, EA has partnered with Microsoft, resulting in releases like Titanfall and timed exclusive content for other games.

While other major publishers has been less vocal about their loss of faith in Nintendo’s hardware, EA’s desertion of the Wii U kicked off a trend that has seen a steady erosion of support. Nintendo has a protracted history of fostering poor relations with third parties and there simply isn’t much incentive to release software at the Wii U.

Source: Xbox.com .

The loss of support from EA and other publishers has created a situation that requires Nintendo to be almost the lone motive force behind its platforms. This problem is less severe on 3DS, but a glance on the 2014 lineup for Nintendo’s handheld and chief breadwinner reveals that the corporate is stretched thin.

For this reason, its next handheld and console hardware releases will likely receive largely similar versions of the identical software. Iwata has stated that Nintendo’s next hardware releases will feature hardware architecture very like what’s currently present in the Wii U, and Nintendo is absolutely not equipped to support two distinct platforms without meaningful third-party support.

Can Nintendo make the proper moves?
Having a unified hardware ecosystem could help Nintendo to enhance its third-party situation by offering publishers a bigger user base, but a number of the issues the have ended in decreasing support would likely remain. Nintendo must modernize its online offerings if it desires to regain the favor of third parties like EA. Doing so should be essential for achievement in both gaming and Nintendo’s budding quality-of-life business. The corporate still has explosive potential, but there are lots of obstacles it should should overcome before it might get over the wear and tear attributable to Wii U.

Bigger than the unique Wii, here’s the largest thing to come back out of Silicon Valley in years
If you thought the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad were amazing, just wait until you spot this . A hundred of Apple’s top engineers are busy building one in a secret lab. And an ABI Research report predicts 485 million of them can be sold over the subsequent decade. But that you would be able to put money into it at present… for only a fraction of the cost of AAPL stock. Click here to get the entire story on this eye-opening new report.

Keith Noonan has no position in any stocks mentioned, and neither does The Motley Fool. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools won’t all hold the identical opinions, but all of us believe that 0 considering a various range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a 1 disclosure policy 0 .

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Can Nintendo Recover From Its Wii U Disaster?

Source: Nintendo.com.

Approximately a year and a half after the discharge of the Nintendo Wii U, it’s safe to categorize the system as a disaster. The console is hampered by a luxurious controller that didn’t spur consumer interest and an absence of meaningful software support from third-party publishers. Even worse, the Wii U continues to be selling at a loss for Nintendo (NASDAQOTH: NTDOY     ) and its slow sales make reducing its build cost difficult.

As the system continues on its abysmal trajectory, the worth of Nintendo’s tried-and-true IPs are in danger. The company’s next moves are crucial. The Wii U is destined to move down as one of the crucial ill-conceived pieces of gaming hardware in history, and Nintendo’s place as a hardware manufacturer is in jeopardy. The level of the console’s failure necessitates that the corporate face reality and make substantive changes to its business model. How can Nintendo get back from the Wii U?

Wii U has forced Nintendo to change
Now that Nintendo has admitted that the Wii U shouldn’t be more healthy, attention turns to how the corporate can restore its fortunes. Its biggest successes over the past decade came from products that sought to switch the way in which games were experienced. Alternatively, the failure of the Wii U is additionally traced to a misguided application of that very same strategy.

Nintendo must decide whether it’s going to again try and pitch its next console at the promise of an unproven gimmick consumers or offer a more conventional console that will depend on the strength of Nintendo software. The corporate will even look to diversify its business with a still-mysterious move into “quality of life” offerings.

Nintendo faces very similar challenges to those that dogged its outlook within the days of the GameCube. Sony and Microsoft are the main relevant players in the house console space and the portable market is calling increasingly crowded, this time as a result of mass adoption of smartphones instead of a dedicated competitor like Sony’s PSP. With that during mind, it isn’t surprising that Nintendo is returning to a variation of the “third pillar” strategy that produced the incredibly successful DS handheld.

What is “quality of life”?
The specifics of Nintendo’s quality-of-life business are set to be detailed in June on the E3 gaming expo, but some basic facts are known. The QOL ventures could be become independent from the company’s console endeavors and could be headed up by a separate team. President and CEO Satoru Iwata has also stated that the company’s plans don’t have anything to do with the wearable computing push it’s currently under way.

Source: Nintendo.com.

Nintendo previously found tremendous success with its health-promoting Wii Fit software, but whether the corporate can build a stand-alone business around similar principles within the age of abundant dieting and exercise apps remains questionable. That said, the company’s short-term outlook is extremely depending on its ability to debut a viable QOL marketing strategy within the coming months.

Nintendo must win back publishers
The biggest problem facing Nintendo at the console front is an absence of support from third-party publishers. When the Wii U was first announced, Nintendo boasted of an “unprecedented partnership” with Electronic Arts (NASDAQ: EA     ) that would ultimately disintegrate and cause the yank publisher to desert the console altogether. Instead, EA has partnered with Microsoft, resulting in releases like Titanfall and timed exclusive content for other games.

While other major publishers were less vocal about their loss of faith in Nintendo’s hardware, EA’s desertion of the Wii U kicked off a trend that has seen a gentle erosion of support. Nintendo has a protracted history of fostering poor relations with third parties and there simply isn’t much incentive to release software at the Wii U.

Source: Xbox.com .

The loss of support from EA and other publishers has created a situation that requires Nintendo to be almost the lone driver behind its platforms. This problem is less severe on 3DS, but a glance on the 2014 lineup for Nintendo’s handheld and chief breadwinner reveals that the corporate is stretched thin.

For this reason, its next handheld and console hardware releases will likely receive largely similar versions of an analogous software. Iwata has stated that Nintendo’s next hardware releases will feature hardware architecture similar to what’s currently present in the Wii U, and Nintendo isn’t equipped to support two distinct platforms without meaningful third-party support.

Can Nintendo make the ideal moves?
Having a unified hardware ecosystem could help Nintendo to enhance its third-party situation by offering publishers a bigger user base, but the various issues the have resulted in decreasing support would likely remain. Nintendo must modernize its online offerings if it desires to regain the favor of third parties like EA. Doing so may be essential for achievement in both gaming and Nintendo’s budding quality-of-life business. The corporate still has explosive potential, but there are a lot obstacles it’s going to need to overcome before it will probably get over the wear and tear resulting from Wii U.

Bigger than the unique Wii, here’s the most important thing to return out of Silicon Valley in years
If you thought the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad were amazing, just wait until you notice this . A hundred of Apple’s top engineers are busy building one in a secret lab. And an ABI Research report predicts 485 million of them can be sold over the following decade. But you’re able to spend money on it presently… for only a fraction of the cost of AAPL stock. Click here to get the complete story on this eye-opening new report.

Keith Noonan has no position in any stocks mentioned, and neither does The Motley Fool. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days . We Fools won’t all hold a similar opinions, but all of us believe that 0 considering a various range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a 1 disclosure policy 0 .

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